Welcome to...John Gordon Nursery.
1385 Campbell Blvd, Amherst, New York, 14228

nuttreesnorth.com/0Kgordon.htm / Welcome / farm and descriptions

www.nuttreesnorth.com/0maiLst9.htm catalog as by mail for 2009, not for 2010 except scions

www.nuttreesnorth.com/0Kitems9.htm long list form for 2009, not for 2010 except scions

www.nuttreesnorth.com/book210/book210.pdf 172 page nut tree book needs Adobe Reader free download to open

nuttreegordon@nuttreesnorth.com question / comment

This is a small, mail order nursery. What started as a planting of Hemming Chinese chestnuts in 1962 evolved into a 10,000 nut tree research planting, and is being weeded down to a pleasant few reliable nut and minor fruit trees. Bare root trees are sent after winter break-up in March, April, and May. The nursery mails bare root nut trees in late March thru May; tree nuts, seeds, and cuttings sent in March (chestnut seed sent in March after possible freezing). Scions are my main product because squirrels count all nuts, hanging or planted, as their's.  Scion wood is 12”( ISgraft.jpg ), and a few (check availability) dormant Filbert and Mulberry are 18”/$3, rootable cuttings sent in March. This site is cool ( GDD50.jpg ) with winters -20DegF on this frigid river flat, ancient lake bed along Tonawanda Creek. The soil is 8 inches of garden soil on top of 9 feet of a silt and sand. Clam and snail shells are in the old Lake Tonawanda/Niagara River bed. Special native chestnuts and red oaks are locally adapted to this sweet walnut/pecan soil. Typical native chestnuts, and especially Korean nut pine need constant attention with battery acid/actually agricultural sulfuric acid in water. Yellowing of leaves means more acid/less grass. Typical hybrid chestnut, hickory/pecan, hazel, and walnut bear large nuts productively under local conditions. Testing is in cooperation with members of the Northern Nut Growers Association, the North American Fruit Explorers, The PawPaw Foundation, New York Nut Growers Association, and especially the Society of Ontario Nut Growers, who need similar nuts under a similar season.
. . Nursery items: walnut, hickory, filbert, chestnut, pawpaw, persimmon, shelters, book, and other.
. . . . .The Walnuts - Black Walnut is the most common nut in the eastern United States. All walnuts like moist, sweet garden, or apple orchard soil. Japanese Heartnuts are a favorite walnut for ease of cracking. Grafted Heartnut selections are like lockets which open mid seam. Denting the shoulders of the nut on its seam with a vice grip pliers, releases the kernel, which should dump out. Grafted Black Walnuts will split shell revealing a large kernel, which can be nipped free of clinging shell. The thin white shelled Persian (English) Walnut can drop clean of its hull, but under orchard conditions requires spraying  for codling moth, walnut blight, butternut curculio, and husk fly. Other walnuts carry their hulls past maturity until the hulls are pressed or degraded off; first a yellow/softening/staining stage, then darkening to ink, and then moldering to black duff.
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. . Juglans ailantifolia var. mandchurica Covel Manchurian is a vast improvement over "typical" Japanese walnuts, and native butternuts ( J. cinerea ). Though the kernel of Covel is tight in the half-shell, it is not keyed in. Its flavor and production are tops, but we suffer with a fortified shell, and difficult banana shape. The seedling from Covel, Blunt Heartnut, retains the Covel flavor, and blunt point, and cracks like the better heartnuts.
. . Juglans nigra Black Walnut - Elmer Myers is an Ohio selection noted for timber tall straightness, large kernel, and high nut production. Kernel extraction requires cracking like a hickory nut, striking across the nut to crush the hard, mid-ridge septum to release this mid-shell in fragments. Cutting only pops off the thin outer shell, but not the hard septum, which leaves too much strong shell to be cut from under the kernel. Emma K is better cracking like the slotted varieties because its shell is slotted way down the shell along kernel's joint to the embryo. It is totally thin shelled, so end cracking splinters the shell along the long slots that are like the long slots in good heartnut. Elmer Myers joins poorly to the embryo through a small, round, "shoe lace" hole, not a slot.
. . Juglans regia Carroll Persian is an English (or California) walnut, but very hardy to deep cold (like Carpathian is during the winter). However, more a mid-continent Persian, not as early to flush leaf as the Polish Carpathian does/flush frost tender buds way before the last-late-spring-frost. Among the good qualities of the Persians of the Carroll ilk is a thin, well sealed shell. The sweet Carroll nuts quickly sell out at our roadside. People wonder why we do not corner the market in walnuts with sweet Persians. The true answer is cold-drying "J. regia" walnuts makes any "J. regia" sweet. Ripening and drying while cold is a difficult production process, so some processing at 30F can revive those semi-dried hot. All walnuts suffer in thick grass, and these "J. regia" suffer the most, not able to fight walnut blight, leaf hoppers, or harden branch tips for winter, if grown in grass (no grass is best, as if growing in the old country is among goats or pine trees). I can make any Persian look like the best Persian by killing all competing grass with simazine + Solicam (two year process) applied with first fall frost. Shreve S3 Persian is similar, retained for breeding, with a thick shell to be hammered, but more blight resistant due to very late leafing and ripening.
...Juglans ailantifolia Var. cordiformis Heartnuts - Heartnuts like CW3 are the truly locket nuts. Pressure on the nut's shoulders forces the half shells apart, and the kernel dumps free. Locket is a perfect valentine, and its shells are prized for jewelery/craft. Stealth is a large flat nut which will crack out whole in commercial cone crackers because the half shells shear apart, and slide sideways over the kernel, not damaging it (similarly the medium size Imshu.)
. . J. a. var. c. x nigra/cinerea Hybrid Heartnuts Mitchell is of flat heartnut form. Filsinger, a black walnut cross, had all the best of shape, etc, but does not retain the black walnut flavor (I lost Filsinger due to too wet a site, and am hoping one of its seedlings will be a match). I sent a lot of Filsinger scion wood over the years. Dooley, and Baker have the general shape of a heartnut - butternut cross, but these are mainly trees for breeding. Baker is the most upright tree, and hardiest against arctic cold, like far north butternut.

Variety see0Kitems9.htm

Species

Number of: Nuts, Scions, Seedlings=1.5', 2.5', Graft-wood

Price-$2/oz, $2/ft $4/sdlg1.5', (no $25/grafts)

Total

Example:

Emma_K

black walnut

1 oz.(always adjusted here to 4 or more seed-nuts/oz)

$2

no grafts

$2 (+20% Postage & Handling [+ 8%State Tax @ NY delivery] added at end )

. . . The Hickory - Pecan is in this genus, Carya. These are not locket nuts. Pecan is usually end cracked. The sharpest blow, producing the most shell fragments, frees the largest pieces of kernel. Pecan is a commercial nut because a percussive blow on its ends buckles its shell, and produces whole kernels. Similarly, a sharp hammer blow across the wide center of shagbark, or shellbark, will shatter the shell (the outer case and the strong, center ridge/septum) to expose most kernel. Selections are usually hickories whose flat, smooth outsides reflect their flat smooth insides, and thin shell.
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. . . Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory - Weschcke is a flat, relatively narrow, white nut typical of easy cracking hickories. It is an upland hickory from northern Iowa, early ripening, productive. Porter from Pennsylvania is larger. Both suffer weevil infestation below Interstate 80 due to early kernel fill; not a problem in New York. Yoder#1 from Ohio is a large shagbark which fills later, and is much less troubled where weevils abound. The seedlings of Burton hican grow trees whose large nuts look like Porter, Yoder, and Neilson shagbarks. My advice: If you want to preserve good shagbarks for nuts, grow Burton hican seedlings (These seedlings grow and look like Shellbark Hickory with no hint of Pecan).
. . Carya laciniosa Shellbark Hickory - Their shells are hard, usually tan. Fayette and Henry are the earliest to bear, and most productive of the Pennsylvania shellbarks, often starting to bear on a 15 foot tall grafted tree, and seedlings in the open are surprisingly early, some of them. Campbell's CES#24 from Sarnia, Ontario starts bearing on a 15 foot tree. It has the thinnest nutshell of the shellbarks. It is somewhat of a hybrid with shagbark which is most obvious due to too branchy a tree. #24 will teach you the benefits from branch removal (get "Silky" Japanese extending 21ft saw) to further spread its most spreading branches to light for heavy bearing, otherwise it is too dense (branches like pear, but far larger leaves), weakens itself, and gets storm damage.
. . Carya illineonsis Pecan - Pecan is an educational nut to me. It shows that the earliest ripening pecans grow due west of here on the Mississippi; that removing shaded branches, to grow more nuts, exposes blue jays within the tree to hawks. Planting an under-story of autumn olives fixes nitrogen, and produces berries attractive to fruit eating birds, which get chased by kestrels and harrier hawks until the blue jays receive the hawk's attention. Have a tractor-mower to control the autumn olive bushes. The earliest pecans, whose leaves turn dark green same time with black walnuts, are earliest to split hull, ripen and dry nuts, early to miss early fall frost, which will blacken the moist kernel of the many later ripening pecans that need heat from buildings or lakes for frost protection. Black walnut nuts may be moist, freeze, and not spoil, but not pecan. Here, pecans as late as Fritz Flat will fill, but seldom ripen, unless shaken down, stored a week, hulled, and blow dried before hard frost/freeze.

Variety

Species

Number - Nuts, Scions, Size-Seedlings=1ft ,or Grafts

Price-$2/oz $2/ft $4/sdlg=1ft,  $25/grafts

Total

Example:

Fayette

shellbark hickory

2oz.(always adjusted here to 4 or more seed nuts/oz)

$4 no pecan or hican grafts, exept larger trees for pick-up

$4 (+20% Postage & Handling [+ 9% StateTax @ NY delivery] added at end)


...Bellevue, Iowa pecans - Snaps (1.1" tip to tip, football shape nut, paper shell, but late to release thick hull) is the earliest filling, but Jumbo is earliest ripe because of earlier hull split and drying...next ripening Deerstand, Oaks, Diken, SAA Jumbo /early October pecans. Jumbo/ Deerstand are largest at 1.3".
...Other northern pecans from New Boston, IL (and most large, but third line/late majority Bellevue, IA pecans like PK Colby), split hull in late October, are Gibson, Dejay, and Fritz Flat which retain green leaves after dropping the largest nuts, 1.4", which need shaking and quick processing.
...Carya llineonsis x laciniosa - Hicans - These hybrid pecans ripen with the early pecans, are large, 1.5", whose kernels taste like shellbark hickory, and are easy to crack like pecans. Henke is 1.3". Hy-6, and Kreider /1.5"/a white "Burton". Abbott-thin-shell, (1.2") is a paper shell bitcan (pecan x bitternut hickory), growing next to similar hybrids near Fulton, IL on Highway 30 due west of Chicago, where it ripens in August to taste like a pecan. Abbott ripens in October here, Buffalo, and tastes like a pecan.
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...The Filbert Hybrids Corylus avallana x - American hazel, Corylus americana, is a small, densely suckering nut-bush (half lilac size) that grows native here. They hybridize with European filbert to form a large "lilac" nut bush. The pea size of native nut hybridizes up to marble size kernels. These hybrids are winter hardy, but need sorting for Eastern Filbert Blight (EFB) resistance. Hybridize these with Turkish tree hazel, and they get larger with thinner shell nuts. Turkish are just hardy enough to fruit heavily after a normal zone six winter. Their multi-strand yellow-green-brown catkins flush too early. Few Turkish hybrids have shown enough EFB resistance. Many more Slate hybrids are highly resistant, hundreds out of thousands still stand with no cankers after many years of bearing.
. . Corylus avallana crosses, (complex hybrids) - Slate's Hybrids - Professor George Slate ran his unofficial projects with Persians, filberts, persimmons, and pawpaws at the Geneva NY Horticultural Experiment Station. He made many crosses with European filbert, and Turkish tree hazel, starting with Rush hybrids (C. avallana x C. americana). Great benefits of Prof. Slate's work were putting two and maybe three genes for EFB resistance in filbert, one from each species, and using tree hazel to remove the hard helmet from European x native hybrid nuts, and give more bud mite resistance. EFB surfaced late in his project (1970s, at his fourth generation), and gave us the new project of evaluating EFB resistance. Few of the Slate EFB resistant selections are propagated except at the Grimo Nut Nursery in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario, www.grimonut.com .

Variety

Species

Number - Nuts, Scions, Seedlings=2'ft, or Layers

Price-$2/oz $2/ft $4/sdlg=1.5ft ($15/Layer  out)

Total

Example:

Slagel

filbert

(6) feet graft-wood

$2

$12 (+20% Postage & Handling [+ 9%State Tax @ NY delivery] added at end)


. . . Tree filbert Hybrids Corylus avallana var Rush x Corylus colurna - SlateTree filberts are 30 ' tall, several stem nut-trees with gray flaking bark, and much larger, thinner shelled nuts than tree hazel. These were also bread, not from Rush, by Jack U. Gellatly of British Columbia which turned out hardier, but even less EFB resistant.
...This completes my Filbert/Hazel breeding with the bushes that were large with no blight in year 2001. Main reason: It looks like EFB passed to Autumn Olive (same blotches appeared on A.O.), and when it passed again it carried a virus that knocked EFB off all Fibert and A.O. I lost the cankers that let me check resistance, but I have too many trees anyway, and now I guess I understand why Europe and Asia have no EFB. Dr Tom Molnar at Rutgers/NJ is pressing on, evaluating EFB resistant filbert selections, and now their nuts in winter 2009-10.

...The Chestnut...Think Hybrid Sweet Chestnut whenever a sweet Chestnut tree is located in Western New York. The northern Chinese, or hybrid of native with Chinese, Japanese x, Chinese x Japanese x, or European x complex x, is what we have.
... American chestnut/Native chestnut always get the bark blight, has a penny size nut, and is usually adapted to very acid and porous soil, but it is the chestnut most hardy toward short season, winter cold, and bright winter sun during an arctic high, which raises fluids under the bark, allowing rapid freezing to destroy bark (called southwest injury). Chinese and Japanese are often stripped of bark by southwest injury. Hybidizing is a long process needed to increase hardiness, but very necessary to get big, blight resistant nuts/nut trees started. Genetic engineering is necessary to combat today's imported diseases (Black walnut has a bad disease working its way toward us from the West Coast.), but fixes one thing at a time, and will make nuts as expensive as pharmaceuticals for the foreseeable future. You know that government will not do this expensive research, leaving it to the private sector (do not count on much), except for rule making/changing.
...Chinese chestnut is long season, quarter size, adapted to pH 6.5 garden soil, and usually resists the bark blight. The Chinese with-native-cross has the problem of a loop of Chinese DNA is left hanging where chromosomes do not match.
...European chestnut - Castanea sativa endure Zone 6 winters in the Lake States until blight, or an arctic high kills them.
...Japanese - Castania crenta is a much better breeder because it has blight resistance, crops during our cool growing season, has gall wasp resistant due to tiny buds, and has the largest, earliest ripe nuts. Etter Haus hybrid is much the Japanese size shown. Most Japanese hybrid seedlings produce the sweetest-off-the-tree,1+" nuts (never yet the 2" of fully Japanese).
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see d-sCHS00.jpg
...Castanea molllissima - Hemming strain Chinese chestnut - Mine are from the few survivors of a bushel of chestnut seed brought back from the Paradise Plantation, Maryland in 1962. I was told at the time that Chinese chestnut does not survive above Maryland, but that Hemming is short season, and is the first non-hybrid Chinese to try. Survivors have thick dark bark like black walnut's, and sap wood the hardness of heart wood.
...Castanea mollisima x dentata - Chinese x American - Douglass hybrid chestnut - These originated with Earl Douglass of Red Creek, NY. His birdhouse business took him from New Jersey to Massachusetts, and he brought back hardy Chinese and Japanese. The best Chinese he crossed with a noted surviving American. A generation or two later he selected for seedlings with large nuts. The largest Douglass trees with the largest nuts were grafted here. Douglass hybrids look 75% American. Blight is still a problem, but it moves slower than the trees grow; allowing continuous resprouting, and production of nuts until crowding shuts off light.
...Castanea x complex hybrids x C. crenata - Ridge strain chestnut - These started from seed gathered off the best, hardy, large Japanese trees in Chestnut Ridge Park, Orchard Park, NY. The earliest, sweetest "Japanese" seedlings/chestnuts come from these Chestnut Ridge seedlings, and other Japanese hybrids.
. . Castanea x complex hybrids x sativa - Layeroka strain European hybrids. These started with Jack U. Gellatley in the Okenogen Valley of British Columbia, Canada. Layeroka mirrors many of its seedlings, seeming to produce identical twins with blight resistance like Douglass: somewhat short, American form tree (few as hardy as American), and productive of early ripe, large 1 3/8" chestnuts. Simpson strain European hybrid is similar in complex breeding, but later ripening. Pollen is often lacking in these part European types, so both Layeroka and Simpson are pollen sterile, and their seedlings can be pollen sterile.

 

Variety

Species

Number - Nuts, Scions, Seedlings=2' 

Price-$2/oz, $4/ft, $6/sdlg-2ft (no $25/grafts)

Total

Example:

Ridge

hybrid chestnut (with small Japanese buds)

(10) 2' seedlings (seedlings are 2 feet tall above ground, add $2/extra foot)

$6

no grafts

$60 (+20% Postage & Handling [+ 9%State Tax @ NY delivery] added at end)


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... Pawpaw - Michigan-Indiana-Ohio sorts - Pawpaws on anchient Indian trade routes grow here at the base of limestone escarpments, but seldom do they fruit or ripen properly. The reason seems to be thin over story foliage, then deep humus for survival, but few selections to make early sorts. However, St. Davids, Ontario has good sorts not properly evaluated. Pa Goldens are selections from early ripening material from the cold, deep valleys with rushing streams of Pennsylvania. Selections from Pennsylvania seedlings have produced the earliest ripe pawpaws here. Overlease, from the south side of the Michigan-Indiana boarder (the margin of a reservoir where water level fluctuates), is large and early. Breeding these together has produced early fruit here, with a large yellowish globe of flesh covering its nickel size seeds. The Overlease types seldom ripen to a thin yellow skin like Pa Golden, except in IN, but its greenish NY skin is okay. It retains the bitter cancer and insect fighting chemicals of pawpaw's branch tips. (Pawpaw is what you treat yourself with when you cannot get Soursop.) A bit of green pawpaw with a bit of chocolate heightens a chocolate after-taste when most flesh is creamy ripe (I tolerate a bit of bitter rather than going to find chocolate.) Pawpaws are like sumac (see the Soursop tree picture in link above.), similar stand of trees, tree size, and wood strength, but spritely like small, gray pear trees with giant tongues of leaves. They try to run out a whole stand form root sprouts from one individual. In nature this stand prospers near flowing water with major roots just under leaf mold. Broad water produces a stand with the required light, if out of strong wind, while most stands in our woods are shaded-out. In Indiana they do well in areas swampy enough to suppress (topple) any large trees. To get pawpaw into an orchard setting we start pawpaw by acidifying soil to keep leaves green and growing, not yellowing and stunted. Pawpaws like mulching with wood chips, grass clippings, newspapers, spoiled apples, most any organic mulch which keeps soil just moist without much sod, or much cooling. Keep mulch thin/back from the bark at the tree's base, or the thin bark can be infected by green mulch as easily as is chestnut. Pawpaws are pollinated by carrion flies and beetles, which like full sun as do bearing pawpaws like full sun. Pawpaw fruit ripen best on the tree (not the fruit bowl, which is too drying and warm), or in the leaves under the tree. The ripening fruit will tolerate some frost and freezing, and still ripen with green skin. Avoid raccoons by early/constant harvest. I did send grafted pawpaws with individual tree shelters, but switched to a white plastic kitchen bags. Pawpaws often overheat in the shelters (if not removed at 80 F weather), and this is often forgotten. Shade and acid are both needed for pawpaw the first growing season, or anytime leaves are slow growing/easily sunburned; therefore pawpaw transplants, sprouting seed, and new grafts, need shade 10 AM to 2 PM using white plastic bags stapled on stakes for most of their first growing season.
...Asimina triloba Pawpaw - PA Golden Strain pawpaw is early ripening coming from the deep, cold valleys (remember the Grand Canyon started waring down its bed in PA) above Harrisburg. PA Golden ripens its whole crop in unusually cool seasons, less than 2400 growing degree days/50F, here. We get an unusually cool season, one in eight years. As often we get a 2900 GDD year when everything ripens. All pawpaw trees endure cool summers, then cold winters here, but selections with the largest fruit ripen few fruit in a real poor 2300 GDD season, while that same year all their fruit ripened in Ohio and similar 3000 GDD climates. PA Golden 1 , and PA Golden 3 (is best) are now grafted selections. Their rich yellow flesh and skin indicate ripeness in mid-September. Some lifted sprouts are on their own roots. This is tricky, following the roots out from the ortet tree, unless the desired tree is off by itself. Often it takes transplanting with a big tractor back-hoe to find a place where the desired tree is off by itself. PA Golden, Taytwo, SAA Zimmerman, Overlease, and Campbell's NC 1 are progressively later and larger fruit. With good growing during a warm season NC 1 has ripened pound fruit, thrice the size of the fruit of PA Golden, and twice the size of Taytwo, SAA Taytwo, SAB Taytwo, SAA Zimmerman.

Variety

Species

Number - Nuts, Scions, Size-Seedlings=1.5', or Grafts

Price-$2/oz $2/ft. $4/sdlg-1ft,$6/ea-1.5' $15/grafts

Total

Example:SAA Overlease (Sorry, pawpaw seedlings are from mixed select seed)

midwestern pawpaw (Sorry, seed is from mixed selections, open pollinated)

(3) 1' seedlings (minimum for good pollination)(seedlings are 1 ft. tall above ground.

$4 (note- white plastic kitchen bag should be stapled on stakes for shade 10AM-2PM 1st year.

$12 (+20% Postage & Handling [+ 9%State Tax @ NY delivery] added at end)

. . . . . Persimmon - Midwestern native persimmon from central Iowa east to central New York is a hardy, soft, apricot-like (but containing 2 or 3 "water melon" seeds) native persimmon, hardy and early enough to grow and ripen here. This is the 90 chromosome race of native, some of whose members can be as hardy as Black walnut. The 60 chromosome East Coast race is not grown due to poor resistance to cold and southwest injury. Oriental persimmon is not grown due to requiring a 180 warm day season, so dies with our first frost at 160 days. When late ripening, orange fruit is often left on the trees for winter decoration, robin or crow food. Its value as food is often overlooked because when it looks ripe it is puckery, and when it looks past ripe it is edible. The trick is to pick persimmon, or pick it up, and break the skin. If a sweet apricot smell is smelled, that fruit is ripe, and non-puckery.

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. . Diospyros virginiana - Native Persimmon - Usual ripening order of the persimmon is: Dickie/NC 10 (early September), Szukis, Geneva Long, Prok, SAA Pieper, Yates (late October). Pieper persimmon is ripens all its crop in one week in late October, here. These named persimmons are grafted. SAA Pieper was propagated on its own roots from a Pieper seedling. Because the Pieper ilk persimmons ripen late here, and have small egg fruit, the fruit hangs ornamentally on the tree into winter. Persimmon seedlings vary in standing up to deep cold and southwest injury. I do not pamper trees, so favor a fast growing tree like the very hardy Pieper or Prok from Iowa and northern Illinois respectively. Some persimmon seedlings are female, but most are male, and bear no fruit. The most valued (saved) males must have early pollen (and are largest, healthiest in all features) to cover all the early flowers (bloom one day and abort the next if no pollen) on our unusual northern/early flowering females. Campbell's NC 10 or Dickie are the earliest ripe with fruit dropping from mid September to November. Szukis has both sexes on the same tree. It will pollinate itself early, and all the other varieties. Usually persimmons, like apples, are larger with seeds than without. Seedless native persimmons do a trick of chestnut pollen triggering fruit-set (but no persimmon seed). Geneva Long has many Oriental traits/somewhat the taste. If it is hybrid, it is from Prof. Slate's hybridizing at Geneva. DNA tests are needed to confirm it is a hybrid. Prok (and yellow sister Korp) is/are the size of Oriental, and ripen late October, large fruits, but as the season cools, and drying takes over the ripening, the fruit size reduces. Yates is a quality tree and fruit that ripens most of its crop here.

Variety

Species

Number - Nuts, Scions, Seedlings=1.5',
or Grafts

Price-$2/oz $2/ft. $4/sdlg=1.5ft,

Total

 

 

 

 

 

Example:SAA Pieper (Sorry, persimmon seedlings are from mixed select seed)

persimmon

(3) 1.5' seedlings (should get 8 for male & female mix)(seedlings are 1.5' foot tall above ground, add $2/extra foot)

$4 . . .

$12

Pieper

persimmon

2 own root . . . (Better have a neighbor male persimmon, or chestnut to get fruit, or add Szukis-bi-sex.)

 

 

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. .Prunus amygdalus Hardshell Almond. - Campbell's NC 1 almond was hardy and productive with small size kernels where peaches can be grown (not easy here due to too much plum fungus and virus, but local American plum (Prunus americana), used as rootstocks, survive unaffected and fruiting, and gave us a look/hope). American plum is not a commercial root stock because peach, almond, and Japanese plum way over-grow it, and eventually bend it to the ground.
. . Morus alba x rubra - Illinois Everbearing and Collier are purple mulberries, 1.5" long by 0.5" diameter. IL Everbearing is very hardy and erect. Semi-weeping Collier is easier to train low for picking.
. . Cornus mas - Cornelian Cherry - Black Plum is known for its early ripe, inch long fruit, and a very dark green glossy leafed large bush; small yellow flowers never frost injured. Graft early/before last spring frost/bud swell for flowering/leafing.
. . Elaeagnus umballata Autumn Olive is a spreading bush which enlivens trees they are under by fixing nitrogen. All three of these fruit like limestone (sweet) soil, and associate well with walnut, and pecan. A.O. berries are refreshing like lemonade while picking up nuts, promote hawks by keeping fruit eating birds/hawks hanging around. Tractor mowing is needed to keep the grove open because the A.O. bushes lean over/can take over.
. . 30"x4" Diameter tree shelters are a big help in starting transplants. I send bare root seedlings which need the transplants to grow vigorously on stored energy. New rooting follows vigorous top growth which risks desiccation in a drying wind. Sustained growth is possible in the moist air of a greenhouse, and that is what tree shelters provide. They should be fitted so that a transplant is topping out of the shelter in 4" with the third or fourth small leaf/as the first full leaf is dark green in the shelter. If the shelters are to remain for months or years (not a good idea except with filberts) 3/4 inch holes should be drilled, 6/8 total at six inch centers Swiss cheese pattern to let the wind ventilate, chill, and vibrate the tree for hardening-off. (Borrow a rechargeable drill/metal-cutting bit). Shelters for filberts/American chestnuts do not need holes, and filberts should not have them because filberts are exceedingly hardy, and the shelters should be renewed to cramp-in and cramp off/kill off suckers. Use mouse bait if holes/wasp spray on nests May into Sommer, holes, or no holes.
. . The book, Nut Growing Ontario Style, is a 172 page soft cover manual published by the Society of Ontario Nut Growers. There are chapters on each species of nut, pawpaws, persimmons, grafting, and our attempts at breeding. I recently learned that it takes much more stock/sixty well populated lines/ to keep improving those lines. Good luck, because none do that though The American Chestnut Foundation talks about it as necessary to reestablish American Chestnut as a forest tree.

Variety

Species

Number - Nuts, Scions, 

Price- $2/ft-scions $4/sdlg-1.5 ft

Total

 

mulberry

. . . (scions only)

 $2/ea ft.

 

 

 

. . .

 

 

 

cherry dogwood

. . . (scions only)

 $2/ea ft.

 

 

autumn olive

(1.5 ft.seedling)

 $4/ ea.

 

NutGrowingOntarioStyle

book

 

. . . . . .$12/ea

 

30" x 4" Dia.

corr-poly shelter

 

. . . . . .$2/ea

 

 

NAME . . . .

STREET . . . . . .

CITY & STATE . . . . .

ZIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SHIP TO . . . .

STREET . . . . . .

CITY & STATE . . . . .

ZIP . . . . . . .

CHECK # & DATE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SHIP WHEN?

. . . . . . .

Variety

Species

Number

Price & Size

Total

  better use0Kitem10.htm list

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub total

 

 

 

 

20% Postage&H

 

 

 

 

Sub total

 

 

 

 

8%s.t.NYresident

 

0Kgordon prints 8 pg

Make check to
John H Gordon Jr

 

Total

 

Send to: John H. Gordon Jr., 1385 Campbell Blvd, Amherst, NY 14228-1403
(716)550 1643, nuttreegordon@nuttreesnorth.com question www.nuttreesnorth.com/0maiLst9.htm catalog as by mail www.nuttreesnorth.com/0Kgordon.htm this web page = some description of farm nursery and varieties